Direct Mail with Purpose

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Don't chop down the mailboxes yet. Texting hasn't replaced all phone calls and email has not replaced direct mail. As a matter of fact, industry reports show very little decline in Direct Mail volume over the last three years. But this article is not about the volume of direct mail, it's focused on the purpose.

Here are 4 common uses of direct mail:

1. New Customer Acquisition
Direct mail reaches a physical mailbox that 98% of us open every day. A targeted mailing list can tell us if the recipient has kids, what their income is, and how much they paid for their house. Recipients must touch your printed piece before they recycle it, giving you a couple of seconds to grab their attention.

2. Migration
This category of mailing includes up-selling, cross-selling, bounce back, and inactive customer motivators. The recipients of these mailings are somewhat known to us as past customers. You must reenergize these recipients by using data captured from your past experience with them. Personalized variable printing is very effective with this market.

3. Database Updating
It's likely that your customer mailing list is larger than your customer email list. And maybe your customer moved since they last purchased from you a year ago. A personalized direct mail piece, accompanied by a reward incentive can yield up to a 40% response rate. Your customer will update their profile and you have just reengaged them in a marketing conversation.

4. Multichannel Marketing
Studies continue to show that the combination of direct mail with email campaigns increases the response rate by three times over either effort on its own. It's important to preserve your brand so that the recipient understands the cohesiveness of your campaign. A well-planned, combined effort will reward you with sales.

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